Author: thegreengazette

“What is happening with Farmers’ Markets in the Cariboo this COVID-19 year?” The short answer is: “Markets are continuing on!” but the reality is a little more complex than that. Four Cariboo farmers’ markets—Williams Lake, McLeese Lake, South Cariboo (100 Mile House), and Harvest (Quesnel)—are members of the B.C. Association of Farmers’ Markets (BCAFM) and as such are under the guidance and regulation of this provincial organization. The BCAFM has worked closely with the B.C. Centre for Disease Control in developing guidelines for the safe operation of farmers’ markets throughout the province. Here are the considerations that markets are…

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By Lisa Bland, Publisher/Editor-in-Chief, The Green Gazette – Dear Readers, What a crazy past few months we’ve been through! The collective landscape is dramatically different than it was when the spring Green Gazette went to press in early March. Like many people and businesses, at first, we weren’t sure how to proceed. Once the initial chaos and letting go of the old way of doing things passed—along with a time of adjustment and reflection—a path tentatively emerged as we got on top of COVID-19 cases and BC gradually re-opened. Here at The Green Gazette, we’re pleased to be back with…

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Nicola Finch, Cariboo Community Natural Burial Association — In many respects, our new reality feels like a return to an old way of being with a slower, gentler focus on family and community and on the world under our feet—the natural, physical world. We have seen a swift shift back to basics, working with our hands, growing and preparing our own food, mending our own clothes, offering what we have to those who need it, reaching out with our hearts, and pressing in on what really matters. We are being encouraged to stay home. We are being asked to limit…

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By Chris R. Shepherd — Illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade poses an urgent threat to an increasingly long list of animal species around the world. In many cases, it is the primary threat, though this is often not recognized or addressed. Trafficking, in combination with habitat loss and other threats, has led to population declines for a variety of species, and sadly, the extinction of some. Many more will become extinct soon if current trends continue. Few people realize the scale of the illegal trade—it is comparable to the global trade in drugs, arms, and humans, and worth billions of…

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By Danielle Goward, R.H.N & C.P.T & P.P.N.S — During this global pandemic, our health has become a huge concern and a hot topic. This has led to some people panic-buying natural health products and supplements and home gym equipment, creating a record-breaking boom in the health and fitness industry. As a registered holistic nutritionist and certified personal trainer, I have been advising my clients to keep it simple and get creative with their food and activity. Eating a rainbow every day is one way to ensure that your body is receiving immune boosting antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. Here in…

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WildSafeBC is the provincial leader in preventing conflict with wildlife through collaboration, education, and community solutions, and it is delivered by the BC Conservation Foundation in communities across BC. Mareike Moore is the new WildSafeBC Cariboo Coordinator and is excited to be delivering WildSafeBC’s program initiatives in new and innovative ways during the COVID-19 pandemic. These programs include door-to-door information delivery campaigns, garbage tagging, and webinar delivery of the highly requested WildSafe Ranger Program for school-aged children and Wildlife Awareness and Safety Education sessions. While the weather is getting better and people are spending more time outside, it is also…

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There are four general ways we can observe the stars. Ideally, starting with your naked eye. In the Cariboo, when it’s good, it’s good, and we can easily get to a dark place where stars of 6th magnitude, unheard of in the city or suburbs, are visible. Next up is binoculars, where an order of magnitude more stars are visible and faint fuzzy objects can reveal some detail. Then we can graduate to using a telescope. Following the above progression is the best approach and would allow you to get the most out of using a scope. There is another…

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By Oliver Berger — Wow, what a crazy past few months! At first, I was sad to see our Share Sheds close, along with the best Salvation Army (Williams Lake) in British Columbia—a serious gold mine for reusables. Then, all my class presentations got cancelled as schools closed their doors to students. No more garbage talks with the kids. Ugh, what was happening around me? I could not even take my reusable mug to get a to-go coffee anymore! Many efforts to curb single-use products and promote sharing with reusing and repurposing came to a grinding halt. What was a…

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By Terri Smith – A few months ago, our world still felt ‘normal.’ My poignant ‘before’ moment happened the weekend before spring break at a show our performance art group was putting on in Prince George. We were in the dressing room of the PG Playhouse putting on our costumes. I remember looking around at our troupe, these people I love so much, and feeling so grateful for the life I was living. I thought back to four years ago when I first began performing and how it had felt like I had run away to join the circus. I…

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By LeRae Haynes |  Photos by Grant Hill — Grant Hill from Pause to Feather Creations promotes wildlife awareness and conservation with passion, creativity, and a heartfelt belief that you should never, ever take the presence of wildlife for granted. One of the ways he does this is by making bird houses, nature and wildlife prints with barn wood frames, bird feeders, bat houses, butterfly houses, lady bug houses, bee houses, squirrel feeders, saw whet owl houses, and suet feeders. Three years ago, he left the corporate world of industrial cleaning supplies. There was a big conflict between that and what…

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By Jim Cooperman — The pandemic has been a massive shock to humanity, and as a result, there may never be a return to the same lifestyle we have always deemed normal. In fact, the disease has exposed all the flaws in our society, and thus, it could become a catalyst for the changes needed to improve our lives. While most of the key decisions are made in Ottawa and Victoria, there are ways that regions like the British Columbia interior can change for the better. The goal posts are shifting. For too long the mantra of continuous growth has…

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By Terri Smith – I believe creativity is important. When we are creating, we are living in the moment. The worries and cares of life can be set aside, and we can allow ourselves to be captivated by a sense of wonder and excitement. I believed this was important even before the world as we knew it came to a standstill. Now that so much is so uncertain, I believe it is still important, perhaps now more than ever. I have been teaching needle-felting classes for over two years and have been felting for a little over a decade. I…

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By Ryan Elizabeth Cope — The coronavirus pandemic came at everyone like a freak storm arising out of nothing. Even for those self-reliant with backyard or terrace gardens, the DIYers of the world, or the homesteading types, physical distancing rules and myriad restrictions and shortages threw everybody for a loop. Although we have fared better than some places, here in BC, we have not been without our share of illness and tragedy. With spring and summer come themes of renewal, rejuvenation, and new life. These past few months have been fraught with anxiety, uncertainty, and lots of unease, but we’ve…

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By Pat Teti — Who would have thought that toilet paper and baking yeast would be two of the most talked about items in short supply during a pandemic? The surge in home baking has been a positive outcome during an otherwise grim situation, but the difficulty of finding yeast seems to have thwarted some baking plans. This got me thinking about ways of using less commercial yeast and inspired me to review my favourite recipes and experiment with new ones. In this article, I describe four strategies for being less dependent on commercial baking yeast while also expanding your…

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By Ron Young — British Berkefeld or “Berkey” water systems have been around since the 1890s and are commonly used as the water purification system of choice by first responders to disaster areas where clean water and power are unavailable. One of the many advantages of the Berkey systems is they work without power because they use gravity to deliver the purified water from the top canister to the bottom canister. Notice I am saying purified water, and not just filtered water. There is an important difference. You can filter water just putting it through a coffee filter, but purified…

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By Tera Grady — Part of the Cariboo Regional District’s Solid Waste Info Series: Becoming Waste Wise Note: *Reminder to take advantage of our SALE on composters ($40), countertop containers ($5). This deal is available to all Cariboo residents while supplies last. Only one of each product available per customer. To sign up please complete the order form HERE. Learn more about the products at www.earthmachine.com or www.sure-close.com. Spring and summer are the perfect time to start composting or ramp up production of nutrient rich soil in your existing compost pile. A healthy compost pile will be moist, have a…

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By David Suzuki – In early 1995, eight grey wolves were transferred from Jasper National Park in Alberta to Yellowstone National Park in the Unites States. Within two years, 23 more were brought in. The last wolves in Yellowstone had been killed in the 1920s. What happened next was remarkable. Over time, the wolves not only reduced rapidly increasing elk populations, but also caused elk and deer to move away from valley bottoms and riverbanks where they were easy prey. Deer and elk populations levelled off, new growth came in along rivers and valleys—attracting a wide variety of wildlife—and rivers…

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By Guy Dauncey — Who are we? And where are we going on this tiny planet of ours, this bright sparkle of life in a Universe so ridiculously vast? It’s a question worth exploring, if you have ten minutes in your busy COVID day. Almost all scientists assume that the Universe is a solidly material realm, consisting of packages of atoms that have, by the happenstance of chance, turned themselves into polar bears and poets. We may have come from stardust, but we have no inherent direction or purpose. Where are we going? You might as well ask what a…

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Vancouver’s Green Technology Education Centre (GTEC) is releasing its Rebuilding BC report to the BC government. Rebuilding BC is the work of a group of prominent environmentalists and economists in consultation with community leaders such as Ted Sheldon and Coro Strandberg. The report makes 24 recommendations to guide recovery in areas of the economy ranging from affordable housing to forestry. The report’s primary recommendation is the formation of a Resilient Recovery Action Team charged with developing stimulus measures that move BC in the direction of a more sustainable, just, and resilient economy. Rebuilding BC’s key recommendations also include: Employ up…

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