Author: thegreengazette

Rocky Mountain Books is pleased to announce its new titles for Fall 2020, featuring Canadian stories covering a broad spectrum of nature, storytelling, and outdoor adventure. RMB is proud to offer a diverse list of titles by authors creating memorable books that captivate readers and inspire us all to “Think Outside.” Takaya: Lone Wolf By Cheryl Alexander An enchanting and evocative look at the unique relationship between a solitary, island-dwelling wolf and a renowned wildlife photographer. Through journal entries, interviews, and a stunning collection of photography, Takaya: Lone Wolf addresses a number of profound questions and tells a story that…

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By Sasha Makhnevea — I worked hard for four years and received my bachelor’s degree in environmental science in the spring of 2019. But the week after graduation, I began a new stage of life that I call my ‘post graduate depression.’ After graduation, I wasn’t sure what kind of jobs I could find with my degree. All I knew was that I enjoyed variety. For about half a year, I stayed with my five part-time jobs: bartending, banquet serving, background acting, promoting brands, and assisting with events. Having a bachelor’s degree gave me an environmental perspective on the event…

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By Jordan Davis, Executive Director, Downtown Williams Lake BIA — There are many things I have been thinking of over the past months of dealing with COVID-19. First of all, I am very proud of our downtown business community. In BC, and particularly in our area, we didn’t have the same strict shut down of non-essential businesses that happened in other regions. While some local business operations unfortunately were deeply affected or closed their doors this spring, many others found creative ways to adapt to the crisis. With circumstances ever-changing, we don’t know how the business landscape will evolve as…

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By Amy Quarry, Owner, Long Table Grocery — “If we want a garden We’re gonna have to sow the seed Plant a little happiness Let the roots run deep. If it’s love that we give Then it’s love that we reap If we want a garden We’re gonna have to sow the seed.” Lyrics from “Crowded Table” by The Highwomen A few weeks ago at our weekly Zoom jam night, a friend played this gorgeous song by The Highwomen, and it resonated so deeply with me. During these new and wild times we find ourselves in, I think it is…

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By Amber Gregg, Cariboo Chilcotin Conservation Society — I am writing this in spring 2020, amid the COVID-19 craziness. I don’t know where we will be by the summer when this article is published. Maybe by then we will have put terms like quarantine and social distancing behind us and resumed our normal lives, or perhaps we are adjusting to a new way of life. I am very aware that for many people, this pandemic has caused both mental and physical challenges, and possibly financial hardship and increased food security concerns. That said, I have been impressed by what I…

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Bi-annual Garden Tour Going Ahead July 11 — After much discussion, the Williams Lake Garden Club has decided to go ahead with its bi-annual, self-guided garden tour. If you like flowers, mark July 11 (10 a.m.to 4 p.m.) on your calendar. The tour showcases the region’s loveliest flower gardens in Russett Bluff and Williams Lake proper. Participation is by donation and jars will be available at each garden. Tickets are recommended and can be reserved by contacting Nola at (250) 392-6858. Tickets will be emailed or mailed and include a map showing the location and description of each garden. At…

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By Margaret-Anne Enders — I’m sure you have heard it said at least once during the past couple of months of pandemic time—this is a time of great possibility. People say it with hope, with excitement, with the keenness of a new idea. Let’s be honest, though. This is nothing new. It has always been a time of great possibility. It’s just that we can see it more clearly now that the “normal” lenses have been knocked off of our faces. People are open to both the possibility and the necessity of change. There is no denying the need for…

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By Jessica Kirby — The talk of the town is isolation and restrictions. When will it end? What will new normal look like? Since no one really knows for sure, it might make better sense to stay present and see what we can learn. The most important thing that comes from this will be whether we—meaning governments, health authorities, the human race—take heed of the lessons that abound in this scenario and apply them in preparing for next time. Because there will be a next time. It might be another pandemic or a global catastrophe, or an environmental crisis, or…

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By Erin Hitchcock — The COVID-19 pandemic has threatened our lives and transformed how we live. It also places our economic security at risk, especially for those most vulnerable. As a result, food security is increasingly becoming that much more important. Outbreaks at meat processing facilities in Alberta and the United States, at an Okanagan farm, and at a Saskatchewan grocery store have pushed the issue of food security front and centre—if COVID-19 continues to affect the places we currently rely on for food, it will dramatically disturb the food supply chain for all of us. The virus is a…

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By Tim Vant – I have fond memories of growing up in the Cariboo region—as a child, running through birch leaves and admiring the papery bark and the myriad of colours brought on by leaves, wildflowers, and grasses. Every bumblebee was a delight, and every fuzzy black and orange caterpillar a new joyful discovery. Today, the same stand of birch trees we played in has been chopped down to make way for development. Are there better ways to preserve existing greenspace as Earth day turns 50 this year? As plastic production and consumption ramp up to unprecedented levels can we,…

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– Last year, Fraser Basin Council (FBC), a province-wide charitable non-profit organization, launched a new pilot initiative to create opportunities for young people to get more deeply involved in core environmental, social, and economic sustainability issues affecting their communities. In the first year of the initiative, called Co-Creating a Sustainable BC, the organization welcomed a diverse group of youth (ages 16-30) from two regions in British Columbia: the Thompson and the Sea to Sky regions.Youth participants worked alongside each other over eight months to deepen their understanding of leadership within the context of sustainability and climate change, to identify barriers…

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Environmental Defence has launched its new Toxic Ten Skincare Guide to help Canadians make safer and more informed choices when shopping for cosmetics and personal care products. “Canadians are increasingly concerned about the impacts of toxic chemicals in their bodies and the environment,” says Muhannad Malas, toxics program manager at Environmental Defence. “Our new guide lists 10 harmful chemicals, or groups of chemicals such as phthalates and Teflon-like chemicals known as PFAS, that consumers should avoid to better protect their health and the environment.” “It is critically important that consumers make smart decisions to avoid products containing known and potentially…

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– Gendun Drubpa Buddhist Centre in Williams Lake was established in 2012 to provide a place in the community for people to access Buddhist teachings, meditation, or just quiet space for spiritual contemplation. Part of a world-wide network, the centre is affiliated with the parent organization known as the Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition (FPMT). The centre has hosted numerous workshops and classes with resident FPMT and travelling teachers and offers peace and insight through Dharma teachings, which develop understanding in how to lessen suffering and bring greater happiness. Part of integrating these teachings into our daily…

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By Erin Hitchcock – Seedy Saturday and the Early Bird Farmers Market in Williams Lake, May 2 Little can compare to the first bite of a freshly picked veggie, grown yourself or by a friend or neighbour. You can imagine how it formed from a tiny seed and was nurtured by careful hands, fed by nutrients in the soil, and quenched by the rain and the sunshine. Visitors to the 12th annual Seedy Saturday taking place May 2 in Williams Lake will get a taste of that biological wonder and more as our community celebrates that amazing process and the…

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By Gauri Sreenivasan, Nature Canada’s Director of Policy and Campaigns – Let’s face it: we wish there was no need to mark Endangered Species Day. Unfortunately, for now the trends seem to indicate otherwise. In Canada, half of all monitored species have declined (see WWF-Canada’s Living Planet Report ) in Canada since the 1970s, many of them by more than 80 percent. In BC’s central interior that includes species like the Peregrine falcon, white sturgeon, and the mountain caribou. It’s our responsibility to make sure these species continue to thrive, for the health of the planet and for our…

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Submitted by Rail Ties Be Wise – A ten-year Electricity Purchase Agreement (EPA) approved Oct 1, 2019 between Atlantic Power Corporation and BC Hydro will allow the burning of more than 2.4 million toxic rail ties per year at an energy plant in Williams Lake, beginning as early as September 2021. This comes despite a concerted effort by local citizens to oppose the Ministry of Environment’s decision to allow rail ties as fuel. The rationale for accepting rail ties as a fuel source is the projected shortfall of available clean wood fibre to run the plant. The EPA stipulates that…

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By Nicola Finch, Cariboo Community Natural Burial Association – “There is no reason why the plans we make around our own burial or cremation cannot be in keeping with practices that are supportive of nature and mindful of the environment.” —Green Burial Society of Canada The Cariboo Community Natural Burial Association is a new non-profit organization based in Williams Lake. Our purpose is to establish a natural burial sanctuary here in the Cariboo. Natural or green burial at its most simplistic is direct burial in the ground in a manner that does not inhibit decomposition. There is no embalming, no…

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Normally, I avoid deep sky observing around the full moon. It takes centre stage, washing out all the faint fuzzies. Only the brightest stars are visible; like seeing would be from downtown Vancouver. The full moon is very bright in an astronomical telescope, which is designed to gather as much light as is practical. In my 5″ refractor, which has exquisite optics, the view is like what you would see if you were 2000 km away. Features from 2 km and up would be visible. You can see the very smooth area of Mare Tranquillitatis, where Apollo 11 landed. No…

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By Tera Grady – Part of the Cariboo Regional District’s Solid Waste Info Series: Becoming Waste Wise February 18th was National Battery Day and Call2Recycle, the stewardship agency responsible for consumer battery recycling, is challenging Canadians to recycle all their old batteries. According to the 2018 Call2Recycle consumer survey, 88 percent of British Columbians knew consumer batteries were recyclable; however, only 44 percent recycled all their batteries in 2018. This equated to a 37 percent return rate, meaning that 63 percent of batteries purchased in 2018 were not recycled. This leads to the question—where did they all go? If you…

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