Author: thegreengazette

By LeRae Haynes — Health and beauty treatments go hand in hand with protecting the environment at Adorn and Beauty Naturally. The salon offers pedicures, manicures, facials, waxing, reflexology, a range of massage treatments, eyelash and eyebrow tinting, gel nails and polish, and more. What sets the salon apart, according to owner Jo-Anne Lang, is its commitment to high-quality green Canadian products with no preservatives, toxins, or harmful additives. Lang has been in the health and beauty industry for 14 years, and says that what people expect has really changed. “People know more and care more about the products they…

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By Terri Smith — It would seem that readers miss Amadeus. I know, I know: I have said goodbye to that article half a dozen times and then started it up again, but what can I say about popular demand? Starting next issue, I will be submitting a short Amadeus article for each edition as well my new farming article. In the meantime, here’s a little something about Amadeus’ nephew-brother, Baby Goat. Baby Goat’s real name is Caliban, from The Tempest, but he’ll probably be called Baby Goat forever. He was an accident. A few years ago I kept two…

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Without music, life would be a mistake” — Friedrich Nietzsche By Jenna Sipponen — Sometimes your body responds to good music with goose bumps, sometimes you just can’t help but sing along, and sometimes it’s proper to just quietly listen. Depending on your music choice, you may have a combination of these experiences. Music keeps us alive in many ways, keeps us happy, and even inspires us to do great things in our lives. Music keeps the party going, and we all have to admit it gets our toes tapping. “Those darn teenaged youngsters listening to their darn rap music!”…

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— How do I fix the problem with my well? By A. K. (Sandy) Amy — You’ve had your well water tested, and have received a report from your water testing service provider or laboratory. The report shows that one or more of the parameters tested for does not meet the Canadian Drinking Water Guidelines. What do you do now? There are as many answers as there are possible problems with well water. These could range from something as simple as installing an inexpensive filter system, to having to drill a new well. In some cases, where a serious health…

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By Michelle Daymond — As Food Action Co-ordinator, I have been writing articles on behalf of the Williams Lake Food Policy Council (WLFPC) for a number of years now (and it still amazes me that I have actually been in the Cariboo that long!). As I was thinking about what to write this month, I realized it has been a long time since there has been a description of what the Food Policy Council is, who we are, and what we do. The WLFPC was formed as a result of a Community Food Action Forum held in November, 2006. We…

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By Ray Grigg — Choices are one of the many benefits provided by our modern, affluent, consumer culture. A television universe of 500 channels should provide something for everyone’s viewing preferences. Toothpaste? More different kinds than can be imagined. Breakfast cereal? The varieties are overwhelming. Cars? A model with specifications for every possible need. Don’t like the long cold seasons? Just choose a warmer place for a winter holiday. Such choices are more than comforting. Beyond lightening the burden of inconvenience, reducing the stress of adapting, and creating the illusion of security, our choices come with a satisfying sense of…

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By LeRae Haynes — When my children were born I learned to cook with meat. I came from several generations of vegetarians, and wanted my kids to have a choice, moral and otherwise, about what they ate. I’m not squeamish and I love to cook, so I started pestering my friends for their favourite carnivore recipes. “It’ll be great,” they said. “It’ll be so easy,” they said. My newfound decision was put to the test when, as the result of a country barter, a giant dead salmon was delivered to my front porch. Eight months pregnant with a toddler in…

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By Diane Dunaway — If ever there were a bird that captures our sense of wonder, surely hummingbirds top the list. From their aerodynamic acrobatics to the metallic sheen of their feathers, the smallest birds on the planet exude beauty and joy. Bird books note their feisty behaviour. Hummingbirds are a New World species, 338 all told, that can only be found in the Americas. Four species visit British Columbia, and in the Cariboo we see three: the Rufous, the Calliope, and recently the Black- chinned. It’s expected that the Anna’s will eventually wend their way here, too. Hummingbirds are…

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By Jessica Kirby — Thirty years ago, there was no ecotourism. There was tourism, which meant going to unfamiliar places in a recreational state of mind, but the prefix “eco” was reserved for more traditional concepts like “ecology” and “economy,” and not at all for a gentler, and greener way of interacting with nature. Ecotourism in its contemporary expression can mean several things—travelling into delicate, gently touched, environments with light feet and strict respect; low-impact, small-scale travel in relatively undisturbed areas; and, travelling to developing nations to gain perspective and experience for international environmental concerns. In this fast-paced, electronic world…

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By Paul Hearsey and Sandy McNie — We have been organic gardeners for many years with as much self-sufficiency as possible as our goal. Our five-acre farm on the coast had large vegetable gardens and fruit orchards. Cash crops of berries and tree fruits provided much of the income we needed to make a go of it. Selling chicken and rabbit meat, and milk from the goats and cows helped. This was all done in agricultural Zone 8, of course. Gardening here in Zone 3 has proven to be quite a challenge, but entirely do-able. Moving to Horsefly has been…

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By Lisa Bland — This summer, if you fancy heading out on a road trip with stunning scenery and extra ordinary adventure, why not follow a section of the old Cariboo Waggon Road, a route of days gone by that leads to hidden historical tourism gems tucked in the Cariboo Mountains. Taking a right-hand turn after Quesnel and driving 80 km east along the meandering Hwy 26, along the historical gold rush route, leads to the gold mining area of the Wells, Barkerville, and Bowron Lakes region. Here, the invigorating air of wild alpine vistas converge with ghosts of miners…

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By Ray Grigg — Anthropologists such as Ronald Wright in his book, A Short History of Progress, and physiologist Jared Diamond in his, Collapse, are not the only ones noting the precarious condition of civilizations. Now, a report by a multi-disciplinary team of natural and social scientists from the University of Maryland, led by an applied mathematician Safa Motesharri of the US National Science Foundation, has brought the precautionary message from the past much closer to the present. In our globalized civilization, this “economic stratification” is evident in the vast disparity between wealthy, industrialized cultures and the impoverished ones…

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By Ron Young — Blooming of the natural world in springtime and early summer brings us back to our outdoor pursuits, which in BC are often in remote locations. If we have the benefit of a seasonal home, a summer cabin, or an RV then chances are some kind of electrical power system is installed. A few years ago these systems were simply a portable generator with an extension cord, but the evolution of that idea has led to quieter, less expensive renewable energy solutions like solar panels and wind generators. A power system that hasn’t been used for…

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By Bill Chapman — As the snow of another stubborn winter finally recedes, one cry that won’t be heard across the Cariboo is, “Time to watch for the snowbank mushrooms,” or “Hark, morel mushroom season fast approaches; find the baskets!” Sadly these are not common thoughts in spring in the Cariboo and more is the pity because the Cariboo is rich in mushroom bounty. It is hard to say why some communities are mushroom-mad and others are indifferent. Some blame it on the British Isles. Only the people from the British Isles are singularly mushroom- indifferent. However, the Quebecois seem to…

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By Calvin Dubray and the Horsefly Green Team — This endeavour started with adult mentors posing a challenge to the Student Leadership Team at Horsefly Elementary Junior Secondary. The challenge was to propose a question that would form the foundation of a Youth Healthy Inquiry Project. Students came up with the following: What is your question? How much can we reduce our school’s carbon footprint in one year? What plans do you have to answer your question? (What steps will you take?) 1. We will set up recycling stations in each classroom (including Strong Start) and other high-use areas such as…

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By Ciel Patenaude —  What is often seen as the “childlike” tendency to attribute human qualities to animals and the rest of the nonhuman world has long been criticized as undeveloped thinking by many so-called sophisticated realists and philosophers. Viewed as a process of immature “psychological projection”—the process through which a person unconsciously rejects his or her own unacceptable attributes by ascribing them to objects or persons in the outside world—connecting with other species and even non-living objects in this way has been denigrated as a lower form of relation, and an expression of an undeveloped perspective on existence. The…

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By Terri Smith — As spring starts to feel like it actually is just around the corner, I realize that I know a lot more now than I did at the end of last season; and thank goodness for that since the following is an only somewhat embellished account of where I was at in December … Statistics Canada called this morning before I’d even had my coffee. They wanted to know about my yields of vegetables for the previous year. To begin, what crops did I plant? Sheesh! I planted at least fifty different crops, but fine, I’ll list…

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By Jessica Kirby — There are many ways to ring in spring, but none that will have the same global impact as Fair Trade Fortnight – Fairtrade Canada’s two-week, all out celebration of reigning fairness and decency down on the global marketplace. We’ve all seen the stickers and fingered through the pamphlets, but what do we really know about the Fair Trade certification system and its impact on world commerce? Though coffee drinkers and banana fans will likely have a good idea of how Fairtrade International (FLO) and its members, including Fairtrade Canada, run their show, for many the concept…

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By Ron Young — In 1789 Benjamin Franklin coined the phrase “nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.” Ben, a true renaissance man, is considered by some the father of electricity. In Franklin’s experiments he tapped electricity at the end of a kite string during an electrical storm and was able to demonstrate that it had certain properties that no one had previously understood. Since then electricity generation has become one of the most important commodities of the civilized world. But if Ben were alive today maybe he would have said: nothing can be certain…

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