Author: thegreengazette

By Jessica Kirby — After nourishment, shelter and companionship, stories are the thing we need most in the world.” — Philip Pullman These are the coldest months of the year. They spread out grey before us with the sparkle of Christmas left behind and the promise of spring just out of reach. As we hunker down by fires and in feather blankets, taking solace from icy sidewalks and darker days, we are drawn into the perfect storm of yearning, nostalgia, and coziness. Before written word, music, dance, and possibly even speech, humans and their close evolutionary ancestors were telling stories…

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By Ray Grigg — A unique kind of book is being written at Edgewood Blue in British Columbia’s Upper Clearwater Valley. Instead of using words, paragraphs, and pages, Trevor Goward has been using water, soil, and plants. His ideas are not expressed with phrases, sentences, or punctuation but in channels, islands, and stones. Goward’s “book” is the painstaking restoration of a dying marsh, a meticulous and loving effort to return an incredibly rich ecological feature to its former biological glory. This lifetime of work is his “marsh book.” Goward’s project has been huge, complex, and ambitious. Edgewood Blue has been…

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By Susan R. Johnson, M.D. — This is a condensed version of a paper that was presented at the Waldorf School of San Francisco on 5/1/99 as part of a senior project. The full version can be found at thelizlibrary.org. It may be freely copied and distributed. TV rots the senses in the head! It kills the imagination dead! It clogs and clutters up the mind! It makes a child so dull and blind. He can no longer understand a fantasy, a fairyland! His brain becomes as soft as cheese! His powers of thinking rust and freeze!” – Charlie and…

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Image source: www.soilsensor.com By Brianna van de Wijngaard –It’s amazing how close spring can feel once the holidays are done and gone. There is a period of relief once the garden is put to bed in the fall, then relaxation as there seems no end in sight to the winter months. Then January 1 rolls around and all of a sudden, it isn’t two months until March… it’s EIGHT WEEKS! That’s it? Where did the time go?! Oh, that’s right: I spent it sleeping in, eating, and possibly subscribing to a Netflix trial account. Ok, that’s fine. Everything is still under…

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By Lisa Bland — Artists and visionaries throughout the ages have stood at the edges of worlds unseen—gatekeepers to parallel universes, reminding us of the myths, dreamscapes, and mysteries that exist within and around us in every moment, yet lie just beyond our reach. The trust and courage required to stand fully and authentically in the center of one’s creative flow and allow it to dictate the structure of life is a remarkable task in today’s modern paradigm of security-focused consciousness. Imagine you could walk in two worlds—parallel universes, where the fabric of reality blended with inklings from other dimensions,…

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By Lisa Bland — Dear Readers, The darkest days of winter are gone and although there’s no sign of green life stirring under the heavy blanket of snow, the light is returning. I notice my plants reaching higher towards the window, seeking the sun, waiting out the days until they’ll be transported outside. In the Cariboo we are no stranger to long winters, but are so often blessed with blue skies, sunshine, and sparkling days that the season is pure magic for those who venture to the backcountry, hit the local ski hills, or head out on x-country skis or…

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By Ron Young — While much of western society has become overweight and unhealthy from the food we consume we have also become obese with information; it’s just not as evident. Great selections of edible products masquerading as food have become easily available at low cost. That faux food can fill us up and feel satisfying while robbing our bodies of essential nutrients, leading to fat, undernourished, and unhealthy bodies. It is a constant struggle to navigate the literal minefield of bad food, which in many cases is merely a chemical construct of some thing that stimulates our taste…

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By David Suzuki — As people in the Philippines struggle with devastation and death from the worst storm to hit land in recorded history, world leaders met in Warsaw, Poland, to discuss the climate crisis. “What my country is going through as a result of this extreme climate event is madness. The climate crisis is madness,” Yeb Sano, lead negotiator for the Philippines, told the opening session of the UN climate summit, which ran until November 22. “We can stop this madness. Right here in Warsaw.” Given the slow progress at the 18 meetings held since 1992 – when countries…

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By Diane Dunaway — The relationship between humans and honey bees goes back a long way. Cave art from an estimated 8,000 years ago shows a honey-gatherer risking life and limb in pursuit of a sweet reward. Bees and flowers go back even further in their connection. They’ve co-evolved for over 10 million years. The flowers benefit from pollination, thus procreation, while the bees are rewarded with pollen and nectar, nutritional essentials in their life cycle. Of the 20,000 bee species now known, less than 10 are honey bees. Yet after the common fruit fly, honey bees are the second…

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By Lisa Bland — Dear Readers, I can’t believe we’ve already entered the heart of winter and the shortest, darkest days of the year. Although it’s been fairly moderate so far, it still seems like the change in the weather dropped in out of the blue. The scramble for winter tires, snow shovels, snow scrapers, and warm clothing always comes as a bit of a shock, especially when it dips down below -20 and we quickly find out just how winterized we are. Winter brings many blessings too—dazzling snow covered peaks, crisp sunny days and outdoor activities in the snowy…

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By Van Andruss — On October 18, after four years of negotiations, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and President of the European Commission, José Manuel Barroso, signed a “tentative” CETA agreement in Brussels. CETA stands for Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement, and is said by Harper to be the biggest trade deal Canada has ever made, even bigger than NAFTA. Typical of the Harper government, this enormously significant agreement was signed before anyone had a chance to view it. It is still obscure just what, on the whole, we are being committed to, but the following contents have leaked into view.…

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By Ron Young — No matter how well you think you are prepared for the unexpected there is always the “bolt from the blue,” that thing that occurs that you didn’t expect or plan for, also known as the unknown unknown. It’s such a commonplace reference in the aerospace industry, unknown unknowns are abbreviated as ‘unk-unk’. Donald Rumsfeld made the concept infamous during the Iraq war in the statement: “There are … unknown unknowns—there are things we do not know we don’t know.” Well, I had an encounter with unk-unks during a recent snowstorm and power outage and I’m sure…

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By Sage Birchwater — Tucked away in the specialty fish section of Margetts Meats in Williams Lake are the delectable salmon products of Bella Coola Seafoods. One taste of half-smoked spring salmon fillets will have you hooked. However, the other products like regular spring or chum fillets and steaks or ready-to-eat hot-smoked salmon will have your mouth watering and coming back for more. That’s a guarantee. Ed Willson landing a spring salmon. Photo: Sage Birchwater It’s a long way from Williams Lake to the Central Coast waters of Labouchere Channel, Burke Channel, or North Bentinck Arm where Ed Willson spools…

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By David Suzuki — The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change just released the first of four chapters of its Fifth Assessment Report. It shows scientists are more certain now than in 2007 when the Fourth Assessment was released that humans are largely responsible for global warming – mainly by burning fossil fuels and cutting down forests – and that it’s getting worse and poses a serious threat to humanity. It contains hints of optimism, though, and shows addressing the problem creates opportunities. Image: www.flickr.com The IPCC was set up in 1988 by the World Meteorological Organization and UN Environment Programme…

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By Lisa Bland — Dear Readers, Fall is but a memory now, and with it the spectacular display of colour and beauty around us. As the cool breath of winter creeps across the countryside, mist rises from lakes and forests and morning frost covers the ground for longer each day. It’s time to get used to the idea of dressing warm, taking extra care on the roads, stoking the fire, and thinking about indoor activities like gathering with friends, cooking warming foods, reading books, and preparing for the transition into the long winter. Historically, the Anglo-Saxons called November ‘Wind monath,’…

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By Jessica Kirby — If we want children to keep their feet on the ground, put some responsibility on their shoulders.” – Abigail Van Buren November 20 marks Universal Children’s Day, proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in 1954 to encourage global recognition and understanding of issues that compromise the emotional, physical, and spiritual well-being of children. Its primary objective is to bring awareness about children the world over who have succumbed to violence, exploitation, and discrimination, and to encourage advocacy at the national and community levels in ending the abuses millions of children worldwide wake up to every…

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By Van Andruss — Over the years it has been my privilege to know Herb Hammond. Herb has devoted his career to promoting ecosystem-based forestry. In 1992, he and Susan Hammond created the Silva Forest Foundation. Since then the Foundation has worked to create ecosystem-based conservation plans and ecosystem maps with many communities throughout Canada. Herb’s book, “Seeing the Forest Among the Trees,” remains an indispensible guide to the management of forestlands for health and biodiversity. His most recent book is “Maintaining Whole Systems on Earth’s Crown: Ecosystem-based Conservation Planning for the Boreal Forest.” Herb spent a couple nights at…

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By Ron Young — Government leaders and bankers in China have helped fuel a huge glut of solar panels by supporting the industry with incentives and subsidies even when it was apparent that companies were losing money. Burgeoning growth of the Chinese solar industry has been characterized as a mad dash for easy money. As a result, the price of solar panels has seen a precipitous drop over the last few years. For homeowners this has been mostly a good opportunity in the short term. The downside is that many established solar companies worldwide have been unable to compete with…

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By Chuck Handy — I don’t know about you, but I grew up with a fear of sharks. In my mind they were all voracious eaters of human beings. There is just something about the way I was brought up that made it all true in my mind. So the first time I went on a shark dive when the critters were being actively fed while I was in the water watching them, I had to wonder about my own sanity. Would they not go into a frenzy and just tear up any and everything that was near them in…

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