Author: thegreengazette

By Lisa Bland — Dear Readers, Fall is a wonderful time of year. Although the glorious summer days are hard to say goodbye to, as the mornings get cooler and frost lingers on the ground, there is the cozy feeling of retreat from heightened activity that comes with the shortening of the days. Thoughts turn to woodpiles, storing and sharing the abundant harvest, and preparing for the long winter months ahead. The fall is a beautiful time in the Cariboo with its brilliant yellow aspens and low-lying shrubs in hues of red and gold. The last of the huckleberries still…

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By Tera Grady — Part of the Cariboo Regional District’s Solid Waste Info Series: The garbage from Williams Lake and area, including 150 Mile House, Horsefly, Wildwood, McLeese, Frost Creek, Chimney Lake, Alexis Creek, and Riske Creek, is disposed of at the Cariboo Regional District’s (CRD) Gibraltar Landfill. Two to four loads of waste are transported to the landfill in 53-foot walking floor trailers five days a week, each weighing approximately 19 tonnes. Annually there are between 12,000 and 13,000 tonnes of waste disposed of at the landfill. Waste is compacted onsite with landfill equipment into three-metre-thick layers. Once the…

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By Ray Grigg — Real forests are wild. The forests of human contrivance are tree farms, plantations, monocultures, timber supply areas. Such clusters of trees may superficially appear to be real forests, but they are less complex, less organic, less living, and therefore, less enduring. And they were handicapped by their beginnings. Instead of originating and developing by the creative randomness of biological chance, their growth was guided by a defined purpose. They are not real forests because they are not wild. Forest stillness at dawn. Photo credit: Lisa Bland Even real forests can lose their wild quality if they…

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By Melissa LaPointe — Movement is vital to life. Yes, there are the more obvious health benefits of exercise – combating obesity, heart disease and diabetes; building strength, balance, and flexibility; improved breathing, and increased circulation that aids digestion and keeps the organs healthy. But there’s so much more. When we move using large muscle groups in a rhythmical, repetitive way, our body releases serotonin and dopamine in the brain (important mood-regulating chemicals and help with attention, learning, and a sense of calmness) and releases endorphins (happy chemicals that induce a sense of well- being). Melissa Lapointe and son Max…

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By Lisa Bland — The Fraser River, designated a Canadian Heritage River in 1998, is the largest river in BC and has the most productive salmon fishery in the world. Its headwaters begin at Mount Robson in the Rocky Mountains and it empties some 1400 km later into the Strait of Georgia in Vancouver. BC’s history is intimately bound to the Fraser River; it was an essential route between the Interior and the lower Coast, a significant area for food, settlement, and travel for First Nations people for thousands of years, a fertile agricultural region, the main route of the…

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By Jessica Kirby — Long before Martin Forbisher and the Forbisher Expedition celebrated Canada’s first Thanksgiving to commemorate successfully reaching what is now Newfoundland during attempts to find the Northwest Passage in 1578, native people held ceremonies in honour of the harvest and a sense of security heading into winter. In Europe, ancient festivities celebrated having sufficient food stores to survive the winter, and to mark the changing of the seasons. During the 19th century, days of thanks marked community and political accomplishments—the cessation of cholera in Lower Canada, February 6, 1833, the end of war between Great Britain and…

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By Dr. Joel Moskowitz — In the last issue we explored the potential hazards of electromagnetic radiation from iPad use. We learned about warnings from the European parliaments and doctors’ associations in various countries, and discussed the differences between pulsed digital wireless signals and continuous analogue radio waves. This time we are pleased to invite Dr. Joel Moskowitz to share his research findings regarding the health effects of cellphones. I started studying the effects of cellphone radiation when Dr. Seung-Kwon Myung, a physician and epidemiologist from the National Cancer Center of South Korea, spent a year working in my center…

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By Ron Young –Government leaders and bankers in China have helped fuel a huge glut of solar panels by supporting the industry with incentives and subsidies even when it was apparent that companies were losing money. Burgeoning growth of the Chinese solar industry has been characterized as a mad dash for easy money. As a result, the price of solar panels has seen a precipitous drop over the last few years. For homeowners this has been mostly a good opportunity in the short term. The downside is that many established solar companies worldwide have been unable to compete with cheap…

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